The Spoils

Oct 18, 2014 / 143 notes

Anonymous said: Lets say you have been trying very hard to make artwork for at least 8 years now and you aren't really seeing much improvement in the final artwork and when you go to make something really incredible, you get a physical feeling in your chest that there is this ball of light stuck behind an iron door that is bolted shut and that light is all of your personal voice just lodged at the base of your throat. What would be the first step you would would take to getting that door inside unlocked?

I’m developing a book on creativity, currently, with tutorials and demos on ideation, and personal voice development. I will cover a lot of these questions through my Legendeer Workshop, as well. 

In short, you need to frame your search in terms of a question, or a riddle, if that better suits. You will not “discover” your personal voice simply by painting more, or waiting for the materials to reveal something to you. You need to be seeking something very specific, that equates to a marriage of two or more disconnected things. Start simply and try to marry two techniques, materials, themes, ideas, etc. This will relate directly to your technical process only. Other fundamental elements of design, content, color, etc. will all require there own process, but in the beginning, simply focus on one consistent subject matter, and dismiss all of the other formal elements. These are studies in which you are trying to frame your preferences, and develop something of distinction in your work. While the individual components need not be original, the final outcome should be authentic, as it is infused with your intent, your choices, preferences, and most importantly, your experiences. This will take some time, and multiple pieces, but after quite a bit of trial and error, you will find an exciting way to marry these two seemingly disparate elements, and you will have answered the original question that you made with the inquiry of your work. 

Relate this to the Scientific method, and it may become more clear.

All the best,

Legendeer. Live to tell the story.

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Oct 18, 2014 / 16 notes

Anonymous said: do you have advice/could you give some input on how you go about layering/building up tones with paint?

This will sound a bit backwards, but I’ve often found my way to a rich, mature palette through making mistakes that I then paint over and into. My painting process is almost always painting light into a dark ground, or a well refined graphite drawing when detail is more important than shape/silhouette. It really is approaching the middle from both ends, or the same problem with two solutions. On one hand, I will create a full value pencil underdrawing and colorize it. Each step is additive in color, and I consider complimentary colors often as a way of enhancing a color, as well as desaturating it. This process begins with the specific and becomes looser or more general as I go. The second option is much more painterly, and begins with large masses that I am painting into. In this approach, I find that I am painting the negative space around a form to reveal the silhouettes, and adding detail to the interior of the form as a secondary step. 

Hope this assists.

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I’m thrilled to be speaking opposite of Maria Tatar, Chair of Folklore and Mythology at Harvard University at the Boston Book Festival with The Folio Society's release of Treasure Island.
Sterling Hundley: Blue Collar/White Collar‪#‎BBF2014‬ ‪#‎FolioSociety‬
…See More
 — with Maria Tatar.
Oct 17, 2014 / 139 notes

I’m thrilled to be speaking opposite of Maria Tatar, Chair of Folklore and Mythology at Harvard University at the Boston Book Festival with The Folio Society's release of Treasure Island.

Sterling Hundley: Blue Collar/White Collar
‪#‎BBF2014‬ ‪#‎FolioSociety‬

See More

— with Maria Tatar.

Oct 16, 2014 / 154 notes

Treasure Island, written by Robert Louis Stevenson, illustrated by Sterling Hundley

I’m very pleased, honored and humbled to have been afforded the opportunity to illustrate this amazing manuscript under the insightful Art Direction of Sheri Gee for the Folio Society. The process of following the opening act by NC Wyeth was nothing short of harrowing; the type of thing that makes for great fiction. If you are interested is seeing a glimpse of the work, you can find and purchase the beautifully designed and printed book here:http://goo.gl/cRJzLL

I’ll be releasing images from the book over the next several weeks. Follow along to stay posted:

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Oslo, Norway with Liz and Martin. @blankspaceoslo
Oct 13, 2014 / 7 notes

Oslo, Norway with Liz and Martin. @blankspaceoslo

As seen in Norway’s fashionable D2 arts and culture magazine. I hope they said nice things. @blankspaceoslo @sterlinghundley
Oct 9, 2014 / 8 notes

As seen in Norway’s fashionable D2 arts and culture magazine. I hope they said nice things. @blankspaceoslo @sterlinghundley

King’s View, Hole, Oslo.
Oct 5, 2014 / 16 notes

King’s View, Hole, Oslo.

togatherflowersconstantly:

Johnny Cash singing at folsom prison


Is that a giant NC Wyeth painting in the background?
Oct 1, 2014 / 3,894 notes

togatherflowersconstantly:

Johnny Cash singing at folsom prison

Is that a giant NC Wyeth painting in the background?

(via illustrationjunk)

Oslo, Norway offering a bit of @legendeer time out before my solo show opens @blankspaceoslo on Friday.
Oct 1, 2014 / 9 notes

Oslo, Norway offering a bit of @legendeer time out before my solo show opens @blankspaceoslo on Friday.

Provo, Utah inspired work.
Oct 1, 2014 / 90 notes

Provo, Utah inspired work.