illustration

The Spoils

Sep 30, 2014 / 88 notes

Shipping large artwork overseas for a quarter of the cost:

Fellow artists, you may want to share this bit of information regarding shipping large artwork overseas:

Shipping an exhibition of large artwork overseas for a quarter of the cost:

I’m currently in Oslo, Norway- preparing for a solo exhibition blankspacegallery that opens on October 3rd. I’ve been working on paintings for the past several years that are increasingly larger, and that are being created on a variety of supports- canvas, hardboard, and paper. With dimensions of upwards of 8’ x 6’, the logistics have presented some real problems.

Air Freighting and shipping the work was estimated between $1500- $3000 for two packages- 1 crate at 4’ x 3’ x 12” (largest painting on hardboard at 3’ x 4’) and one shipping tube at 6’ x 6” x 6” (large canvas rolled up w/o supports). One month’s advance notice wasn’t enough time to ship by sea. In addition, the shipping companies were requesting specific paperwork, with the possibility of paying a VAT tax (Value added tax) of 24- 30%. Tally this up with what the gallery would have to pay upon return for any unsold items, and the entire prospect seemed rather improbable, if not impossible.

My girl solved this problem for me. She mentioned the prospect of claiming the parcels as oversized baggage. At first, I dismissed the idea, thinking the items too big to ship on the same flight I was taking. As I looked into options, though, I soon realized that the airline (United Airlines) had some limitations, but they exceeded what I thought allowable. On United Airlines, oversized baggage is considered anything over 64 linear inches (l + w + h), while oversized baggage is accommodated up to 115 linear inches. The weight restrictions start at 50 pounds and go up to 100 pounds. For each overage, you will pay $200 for an extra bag/oversized fee.

We did a dry-run on the Wednesday before I left to see if the packages would fit. The dimensions were close, but the Skycap pulled someone in off the ramp to measure, and it all did. United proved to be very helpful through all of this.

In short, both packages were sent from Virginia, United States to Oslo, Norway for $600 total. Here is the breakdown:

Shipping tube WITH stretcher supports- 96” + 8” + 8”= 112” total linear inches @ 34 pounds- included stapler, screws, staples, laser level, etc. 
$200.00

Box with large painting (36” x 48”), 30 prints, two medium paintings on hardboard, 6 illustrations on board, one smallish painting on canvas, and disassembled pine stripping- $200 (overage on size) + $200 (overage on weight at 64 pounds)= 
$400

TOTAL COST OF SHIPPING: $600 + $64 (supplies)= $664

In addition, I was able to precut and ship all wooden supports for display, I was afforded an extra 2-3 weeks to paint the work, and there was no additional tax or charge.

It was a risk, as the work was uninsured- that was the only downside. I packaged it a neatly as I could and rolled the dice.

The boxes showed up- a bit worse for wear, but intact and for less than a quarter of the price that was previously proposed.

I’m attaching reference shots of the packaging materials, included work and costs of supplies for clarification.

Purchased:

1 @Flambeau Bazuka Brand Telescoping Salt Water fishing tube from Walmart - $50
1 Telescoping Flat Screen TV box from The Home Depot @ $14

Additionally, I highly recommend producing large works on heavy canvas that can be rolled, and connecting the stretcher bars without glue (screws only)- for ease of disassembling and assembling.

Hoping this information helps some of you dealing with similar stresses and looking forward to seeing you at the exhibition.

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Progress detail for solo show blankspacegallery in Oslo, Norway; October
Sep 7, 2014 / 50 notes

Progress detail for solo show blankspacegallery in Oslo, Norway; October

sterlinghundley:

Pageantry and Cadence
 
from Sterling Clinton Hundley. 2013, 3’ x 4’, Oil on panel. This work is a continuation of The Spoils of Saint Hubrisseries and will be exhibited at Art Aqua in Miami, along with other works by Hundley in December of 2013. Sterling Clinton Hundley is currently represented by Ghostprint Gallery, in Richmond, VA, and by Blankspace Gallery in Oslo, Norway. Inquiries: sterling@sterlinghundley.com
http://www.sterlinghundley.com

This work and others from the ongoing series, The Spoils of Saint Hubris  will be on display at Blankspace Gallery in Oslo, Norway; opening October 3rd. I will be giving an open lecture, as well as running a one day Legendeer workshop on ideation and personal voice development on Saturday, October 4th, with a Legendeer Meet-up on Sunday, October 5th (www.legendeer.org). 
Aug 28, 2014 / 563 notes

sterlinghundley:

Pageantry and Cadence
 
from Sterling Clinton Hundley. 2013, 3’ x 4’, Oil on panel. This work is a continuation of The Spoils of Saint Hubrisseries and will be exhibited at Art Aqua in Miami, along with other works by Hundley in December of 2013. Sterling Clinton Hundley is currently represented by Ghostprint Gallery, in Richmond, VA, and by Blankspace Gallery in Oslo, Norway. Inquiries: sterling@sterlinghundley.com

This work and others from the ongoing series, The Spoils of Saint Hubris  will be on display at Blankspace Gallery in Oslo, Norway; opening October 3rd. I will be giving an open lecture, as well as running a one day Legendeer workshop on ideation and personal voice development on Saturday, October 4th, with a Legendeer Meet-up on Sunday, October 5th (www.legendeer.org). 

Aug 20, 2014 / 28 notes

Anonymous said: hi there-- your work is fantastic! I normally work with acrylics, but really admire your work in oil. I was wondering how often you use acrylics and about your opinion as to whether or not adding retarder makes for a similar effect to oil paints? I understand that there are some obvious differences, but right now my problem with acrylic paint is that some of my value changes are too sharp because of how quickly the paint dries. Thanks

Yeah, acrylics are problematic in the difference between “live value” and “dead value” after they dry (my terms, not industry terms). I’ve developed a method that allows you to paint directly into gouache with acrylics so that it more closely resembles wet-into-wet oil painting in that your color mixes on your piece, not on your palette. Step 1: Full pencil value drawing. Step 2: Use a light midtone acrylic (I like unbleached titanium white, Liquitex heavy body, diluted with water) to both fix the drawing, and define a midtone value in one step. I apply gouache or watercolor liberally  in areas that I want to be warm or cool (generally only two colors that are complimentary, i.e. orange and blue). Step 3: Once the gouache is dry, I paint the same midtone acrylic back into the gouache which turns the color either warm or cool, dependent upon the temperature of the gouache. The acyrlics still dry darker, but they are changing in value and hue in front of you, not off to the side. Step 4: Redefine darks.

Nothing supplants oils, but this is a process I’ve developed over the years that gives me some favorable results. Hoping this helps!

The color version of my artwork for Monstrous Opimism— In Memory of Kerry Talbott. Prints available soon to raise money for Kerry’s family.
Aug 17, 2014 / 176 notes

The color version of my artwork for Monstrous Opimism— In Memory of Kerry Talbott. Prints available soon to raise money for Kerry’s family.

Jun 9, 2014 / 13 notes

A short trailer from my Legendeer Program. Art informed by adventure. 

Jun 3, 2014 / 48 notes

The Creative Mistress

Making art isn’t a monologue, it’s a dialogue between your materials and your intent. Really, it’s more of a scream in your face yelling match, that gets a little too honest sometimes.

Jun 2, 2014 / 12 notes

We no longer access information; we are accessed. Videos, images, movies, games, music and every other pervasive call to our senses has numbed us to our own considerations. Consideration, after all, requires time. As we give away more of the precious stuff to live virtually and vicariously through the lives of others, we lose sight of our intent. It is from this intent, that we derive content. Mined from our personal experiences, and coupled with those things that permeate our time, it becomes a commentary on the here and now.

Legendeer. Life is story. 

legendeer.org

The new Legendeer Challenge has been posted. Accepting submissions through Sunday, June 8th, 12pm EST.
Post completed challenges to the Legendeer Facebook group; home to a community of illustrators, designers, art directors, climbers, runners, athletes, outdoorsmen (people), writers, musicians, entrepreneurs, hobbyists, and professionals who find common ground through Story.
This summer, think of it as a curriculum for your sketchbook. 
Legendeer, life is story. 
www.legendeer.org
Jun 2, 2014 / 6 notes

The new Legendeer Challenge has been posted. Accepting submissions through Sunday, June 8th, 12pm EST.

Post completed challenges to the Legendeer Facebook group; home to a community of illustrators, designers, art directors, climbers, runners, athletes, outdoorsmen (people), writers, musicians, entrepreneurs, hobbyists, and professionals who find common ground through Story.

This summer, think of it as a curriculum for your sketchbook. 

Legendeer, life is story. 

www.legendeer.org

Creativity breathes life.
 Legendeer
Jun 2, 2014 / 16 notes